Horror book review: I remember you by Yrsa Sigurdardottir

The crunching noise had resumed, now accompanied by a disgusting, indefinable smell. It could best be described as a blend of kelp and rotten meat. The voice spoke again, now slightly louder and clearer:
Don’t go. Don’t go yet. I’m not finished.

In an isolated village in the Icelandic Westfjords, three friends set to work renovating a derelict house. But soon they realise they are not alone there – something wants them to leave, and it’s making its presence felt.

Meanwhile, in a town across the fjord, a young doctor investigating the suicide of an elderly woman discovers that she was obsessed with his vanished son.

When the two stories collide the terrifying truth is uncovered . . .

Taken From Amazon

This book is a really good read, and should be enjoyed now that the nights are getting darker and it is becoming colder outside. If you have read any of Yrsa’s crime novels before, you know that you are in for a treat. Like most of her Thora books, here you also get to follow different stories that in the end come together and tell you just what has been going on.

If you haven’t read any of her other books, and decide to start with this, you should pick up her crime books as well, as all of them have some sort of ghost story element. Even as the ghosts are not a big part of the story, and always lurks on the outside, only felt and never seen, we the readers get to experience them, and the stories never disappoint.

I read her book, ‘Silence of the sea’ first, when I were confied to the hospital and had to stay there for a little while. I read it in two days, and I would have read it all in the first read if I didn’t have to sleep. The mood was perfect, and when the lights in the hospital went out for the night, and I went deeper and deeper into the mystery of the abandoned boat, I knew that I needed to read everything from this author.

Shortly after I got all the books rented from the library, all while trying to buy them when I could. I now have all the books that had come out in either norwegian or english, and have read them all but the newest one. I have also met the author herself and gotten two of my books signed, and from what I saw when I met her, she seems to be a really nice person as well.

So, if you like a good mix of humor, crime and a chilling element of darkness and ghosts, pick up her books. You won’t regret it as long as you can accept some bittersweet endings.

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Horror Book Review: Dark Matter by Michelle Paver

January 1937.

Clouds of war are gathering over a fogbound London. Twenty-eight year old Jack is poor, lonely and desperate to change his life.

So when he’s offered the chance to be the wireless operator on an Arctic expedition, he jumps at it. Spirits are high as the ship leaves Norway: five men and eight huskies, crossing the Barents Sea by the light of the midnight sun.   At last they reach the remote, uninhabited bay where they will camp for the next year.

Gruhuken.

But the Arctic summer is brief.  As night returns to claim the land, Jack feels a creeping unease.   One by one, his companions are forced to leave.  He faces a stark choice.  Stay or go.  Soon he will see the last of the sun, as the polar night engulfs the camp in months of darkness.  Soon he will reach the point of no return – when the sea will freeze, making escape impossible.  And Gruhuken is not uninhabited. Jack is not alone.  Something walks there in the dark.

From Michelle Paver’s web site

As a lover of ghost stories, this book pleasently surprised me when I borrowed it at the local library. I later went on to get it myself in hardcover, and the audiobook, that is amazingly read, and perfect for a cold winter night! It is set just outside of Norway, and there is some things set in Norway, and also a few Norwegian characters like the captain of the boat that brings the group to Gruhuken.

But I think that one of the things that got me with this book, was that they actually used something from Norwegian folklore, and they used it really well. I won’t spoil it here, but it pleased the folklore nerd in me and has kept with me since.

As a story it starts slowly in the cold streets of London, and then it builds as we discover the even colder Artic through the eyes of our hero, as we read through his diary. Then, the sun fades for longer times, until it is gone, and as it slowly fades, we feel a creeping promise that when only the darkness is left, something horrible will happen.

(Trailer for the audiobooks. Can be gotten from audiable for free if you don’t have an account there yet.)
So, as the autumn now turns the nights darker, and as winter closes in, and the darkness takes more and more over, sit down before the fireplace with a good book, or lean back in the chair with the audiobook, and let your mind wander to the cold artic, where danger creeps ever closer in the dark.